CHS Blood Drive Success

CHS Blood Drive Success

 

March 5th was Crawfordsville High School’s blood day. Which means, of course, that Student Council hosted the annual Blood Drive. Sign ups have been out at lunch for several weeks. Anyone sixteen years of age or older can sign up, although those sixteen years old must have a parental permission form. Those students seventeen years of age or older can sign up for themselves.
Student council has been running the blood drive for at least ten years. “Every year that I’ve been in high school they’ve done it,” says Tayla Haas, Student Council president. Blood donated goes to the Indiana Blood Center, and then to people across Indiana. “They try to keep it local,” says Tayla.
Students signed up for thirty minute increments between 9:00 AM and 2:00 PM, though there haven’t been as many as in previous years. “I remember my sophomore year,” says Senior Lily Pendleton, “there were a ton of kids that did it, and I was kind of sad to see there weren’t as many this year.”
Although some students may choose just to give blood on the school-sponsored blood donation day, donors can give up to six times a year, with two months waiting periods in between. Lily has given blood about three times a year. “The first time I did it,” she says, “was the blood drive here my sophomore year, and I just figured that it was something good to do and I’m not really bothered by needles that much, so it’s easy enough for me to do, so I figured, why not?”
Tayla and Senior Sarah Chalmers echo the sentiment. The two were not nervous at all. When asked why they decided to draw blood, Tayla said, “I decided to do it when I was a sophomore and decided to do it because I thought it was cool;but then, I recognized why it was actually so important because people need it every day.”
“Yeah it’s a great way to help people, and save people’s lives and it’s something that all my family’s always done,” says Sarah.
When students come for the blood drive, they flash their ID, proving they are sixteen years or older, and fill out a form about their health, making sure you have no diseases like HIV or AIDS that could be transferred to someone else in their blood. Next, the workers give them free juice and cookies, making sure the donor’s blood sugar is up so they don’t pass out. “Cookies, chips, Oreos, crackers, Coca-Cola, Sprite, Goldfish, Pretzel Goldfish, too, vanilla Oreos, all the Oreos,” lists Sarah of the free food participants get. After that, “you get to sit in a chair, all the people are really nice, and they just check to make sure they’re getting the right vein first, and then, actually donating, you only have the needle in your arm for about five-ten minutes.”
Tayla, Sarah, and Lily all recommend doing the blood drive. “I think people are afraid just because of a needle, but you can get over it for, like, ten minutes of your life,” says Tayla. “And it really doesn’t hurt!” Sarah chimes in.
As someone who has a fear of needles, I am planning to sign up for the blood drive next year. Why not? It doesn’t hurt much, it’s for a good cause, you get free snacks, and you get out of class. Hope to see everyone sixteen and older at next year’s Crawfordsville High School Blood Drive!